Tag Archives: chargers

Traveling Light

Don’t you just love being invited to see someone’s travel pictures? Does the groan escape your lips before you can stop yourself or do you just bite the bullet and suffer quietly? But here is the kicker question, how do YOUR travel pics look to everyone else? hmmmmm? Thought so.. so here are some tips on creating memorable travel shots that wont put your audience to sleep OR cost you and arm and a leg in glass.

Bones of a BE2c

My first tip is a bit odd and not so much a tip as something to think about. Travel is all about seeing the sights and experiencing new things, people and places. Unless you are getting PAID for the trip, it’s NOT about dragging two bodies, half dozen lenses and assorted equipment along. So my first piece of advice is to consider, strongly consider getting a really good point and shoot camera.

In my case, I got a Canon G11 because I truly believe that Nikon’s point and shoots are best left home. None of them equal the G11 in features or flexibility. I also feel that Nikon is making serious mistake with that line of marketing. But anyways, there is the G11, there is the slightly cheaper but in some ways, better S90, the Panasonic LX3 and there are the newer four thirds which are a a marginal point and shoot with swappable lenses. I tend not to include the four thirds in this talk because of their size. The Canon G11 is almost too big but still qualifies as a “point and shoot” due to it’s fixed lens and smallish size.

I suggest a good point and shoot because when traveling with one like the G11, you have virtually all the control that you have with the DLSR. You do NOT have swappable lenses but then the zooms on the P/S camera are pretty amazing at the ranging they can work. I just spent a week in the UK and never pulled my D300 out of my ThinkTank bag. I shot everything with the G11. This leads to another tip.

Leave 90% of the “must have” accessories at home. I did a week in the UK and never used my remotes, my SB800 flash, graphics tablet, D300, 17-55 F2.8 lens, 50mm 1.4 lens, spare batteries etc. I DID use my Epson P5000 to archive my images from the Sd card, I DID use my Macbook Pro for email and fast edits for posting to Flickr so friends and family could see a few shots as I went and I DID use my USB hard drive for my Time Machine backups while in the room. So when thinking about the trip and really think about what you plan to do, be ruthless! Most museums will NOT let you use the fancy flash and/or camera without hassling you about it. Nobody gave a damn about my G11. I lived in my Luma Loop strap and it was great at the checkpoints where I could just unsnap the camera, hand it to security and then snap it back on. No mess and no fuss trying to lift straps over my head and jacket. I like it much better on my G11 than I do on my D300. For my D300, I prefer the Rapid Strap but since we are talking about lightweight point and shoots, really take a look at the Luma.

I consolidated quite a few of my chargers down to three and one I didnt need. The AA charger was not needed since I never used the SB800 flash I brought. The old Razor charger works on my Crackberry and is lighter and smaller than the OEM for the Blackberry. I had the Canon charger and a USB cable for the iPhone since it can charge while connected to the laptop. I had two more USB cables, both the same type so I could plug in both my flash card reader and the external HD at the same time. I did bring a spare power pack for the iPhone for while I was on the airplane since it was 11 hours of flying time and time at the airport. I also have a small two piece plastic stand that holds the iPhone horizontal and at a 50 degree angle for watching movies or podcasts. I brought spare earbuds since I have them fail before.

So what can you do with a point and shoot you ask? Am I going to “give up” anything? Yeah, weight and size. A good point and shoot can perform almost as well as the DLSR. Note I said Almost.. not As well. There is some give and take but we are talking TRAVEL pictures people, not the cover of Vanity Fair or Country Life. You want nice shots that wont bore people to death when you show them. And that my friend is more of YOU than the camera. So learn how to use the point and shoot CORRECTLY. It’s not the same as your DSLR and it will require a different technique to some degree. And it will require more post processing to get the most out of the image. There is distortion in the wide angles, noise even at relatively low ISOs like 400 and on my G11, a distinctly narrower tonal range between shadow details and totalling blown highlights. The G11 also fringes blue like mad on blown or close to blown highlights. So experiment before you leave and make sure you understand the limits and how best work around them.

When I use my G11, 90% of the time I am shooting full manual mode. I tend to shoot ambient light and the G11’s smarts do not do so well with backlit scenes. There is a feature on the G11 that I absolutely love. I can be in full manual, focus on the subject and dial up or down F stop and/or shutter in real time and see the changes on the screen. No guessing, I just focus and dial in what I want it to look like or as close as I can get. This is such a cool thing is nasty lighting like a dim church or museum. I dont have to take the camera away from my eye and look at the screen to see the shot. I just hold it up, focus and watch the screen in real time. The G11 also has a rotating screen which I LOVE!! My old Nikon 950 has one and that is the one feature I miss the most on my D300/D90.

Another tip is to shoot RAW if you can. The JPEGs on the Canon just plain out and out suck. In RAW, I can recover alot of those “blown” highlights and pull back the fringing if I want. I also can run my normal workflow of Noiseware and a highpass filter which gives me clean and sharp images. Much better than the in-camera JPEG processing could ever hope to be.

Use the built in flash but use it wisely. In other words, dont turn it on and leave “on”.. learn to set it just like you do aperture or shutter speed. The built in flash works very well as fill for getting rid of those nasty shadows under someone’s eyes in bright light. It works very well to bring up the shadows in a dim museum assuming you are allowed to use the flash.

Amanda Oxford Portrait

Play with different techniques and post work flow. Dont be afraid of blur or Black and White. I learned a trick from Jack Davis (How to WOW) about using slow shutters while shooting out the window of a moving bus or car for an impressionistic look. With a bit of luck, it looks very cool. Also, take interesting shots of family, they are the models traveling with you and since they tend to ignore you anyways, play into that.

Rider
Blue Skies

Black and white is easily accomplished with today’s tools and remember, it’s BLACK and WHITE, not middle grey which is what you get with default settings of greyscale. It’s all about tones and texture in B/W, not color so strong subjects, close ups and something with a large tonal range can work very well in B/W.

WWII in B/W

Stairs of Light

Dont forgot to use interesting composition!! Dont take the same damn shot everyone else takes. Well, take it first and get it out of the way then start experimenting. You have digital film for pete’s sake, damn near unlimited assuming you either have a large flash card or you brought spares. You DID bring spares yet?

Hyde Park in London

Museum of Natural History Oxford

And FOOD!!! Remember, this is traveling and you are not eating at the same old places (you had better not be!) So sometimes, the food can be quite interesting to shoot and share with friends later.

Pizza

Every one of these pictures were taken with my point and shoot Canon G11 under a varity of conditions. All are not your typical crappy image out of a point and shoot. The equipment helps but in the end, the photographer working the camera makes the biggest difference. The point and shoot allows you to travel very light on equipment and in many ways, frees you to be more creative by doing more with less. Try it and I think you might yourself addicted to using the point and shoot alot more than you think you will.

Happy trails!!

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Batteries and charades

We photographers love rechargeable batteries for our flashes, our cameras and all the other electronic widgets. The current favorite type of battery is called a Nickel Metal Hydride or NiMH for short. These cells have decent power ratings nowdays and can withstand some abuse like fast charging them instead of a slow charge. But they wont keep a charge well, they will self discharge due to internal resistance so after several weeks of storage, you may find the cells only have half their charge.

There are many manufacturers of NiMH cells and they come in all kinds of ratings, 2000mAh, 2300mAh and 2700mAh. They come in less but we are not interested at all in those for what we need them for. There are a couple of things that will make a very large difference in how well the cell works for you. One is the actual size of the cell. I have some Tenergy cells that work ok but do not quite measure up size wise. They are a bit short and a bit fat so they do not work in some tight battery compartments. Pretty damn frustrating at times. I used to buy Duracell 2350mAh cells but I found that they have a very high internal resistance and will self discharge the fastest to flat quicker than any other cell I have.. like in just a couple of weeks. They do not seem to hold up as well even fully charged in my SB800s.

My last favorite cell were the Energizer 2450mAh cells. They held a charge for a decent amount of time and they lasted pretty well under load. But my new favorites are the Eneloops from Sanyo. These are a “pre-charged” cell but most importantly, they hold the charge for something like a full year. And the prices are very close to the classic NiMH cells. And they fit everything I’ve tried them in. But you have to be very careful in buying “precharged” cells. There are only a couple of manufacturers of them and while the Sanyos are good, the cheaper imports from China are not nearly as good. You can not go by brand name either, I’ve seen both Japanese cells (Sanyo) and Chinese cells in the same brand packaging. One guide is to look at the top of the cell, the Sanyos are white, the others are black. A fellow blogger (stefanv.com) has done some really nice work on imperical testing of Sanyo’s Eneloops. You should drop by and read his article on it.

A good charger is a requirement to keep your cells healthy and not burned out at an early age. I use a 8 cell charger (Maha’s Ultimate Professional Charger) and a 4 cell LaCross unit (LaCrosse Technology BC-900) and both work very well. I like the LaCross better and really wish it had eight slots instead of the four. At the miminum you need a “smart” charger, not one of the those stupid wall wart fast chargers which will cook your battery in 15 minutes and kill off the battery. Both of the mentioned chargers have options for a “fast” one hour charge and a two house slow charge and trickle charge. Both also offer reconditioning of the batteries which can revive a marginal cell.

A favorite shop to buy my batteries and chargers from is called Thomas Distributing. They offer all kinds of batteries, chargers, battery packs and more.

And speaking of recharging batteries and charades, bad karma goes to Engerizer and the stupid bunny for shafting consumers on their NiMH D cell batteries. They charge a premium for the D cell but in reality, it’s a repackaged AA in a plastic form to make it look and fit like a D cell. The folks at Naturalnews.com did a autopsy on a D cell and sawed it open to prove the accusation. So if you need the bigger batteries, look at Powerex for your needs. Their AAs are also a highly regarded NiMH cell so you would not go wrong with either.

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